FMOD Introduction

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An Introduction To FMOD, part 5: Integration Into Unity

Lesson 5: Integration Into Unity Alright! Now it’s REALLY been a while since last time! I think it’s finally time to start wrapping up these lessons by answering the one question that everyone has: “Alright Chris, I’m now a master of FMOD thanks to you, but now I need to shove this thing into Unity and make them work so that I can be the master of Interactive Audio!” Well first, that’s not a question, but point taken – to the folks who have e-mailed me, prodding me into finishing up, I can only offer my sincerest apologies because life has gotten way busy this past year. Thanks for the outreach. 🙂 We’re gonna do this. Right here, right now. If you’ve followed along with the set of tutorials so far, you should be able to efficiently bring your ideas into FMOD using the tools available to you. If you need a refresher, you can check out the overview of all the lessons at this link here or hop back to the very first one here. Unlike the last four lessons, this lesson will not build on previous concepts directly since this lesson will focus on integration concepts in tying FMOD into Unity. However, it is still crucial to know the inner workings of FMOD before you try tackling integration, so review if you need to. The instructions are the easy part – it’s knowing the concepts that will take you far. Let’s get started. And as always – if you have any questions, require further explanations, or wish to suggest further topics, email me at Hello@ChrisPrunotto.com or reach out to me on twitter @SoundGuyChris!

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A Glance At Audio Sprites In 1,000 Words Or Less!

In working on a current project, the Twitter-fueled HTML5 -powered game Squirrel Sqript (Which is almost ready to launch, by the way!), I’ve learned a lot about cross-functionality. I acted as a programmer on this team, and as all programmers must do, I had to overcome certain unique problems presented by the platform and the project. Because the game is HTML5, our team encountered an issue in that browser-based games (particularly mobile browser-based games, and especially mobile browser based games) don’t necessarily support audio in the way you want them to. And no single codec is accepted by every browser. AND the performance hits are dramatic for even some of the simplest of audio related functions. AND the list of quirks goes on. It’s maddening! Not even sites specifically built for audio like SoundCloud offer great usability on mobile because putting your phone to sleep not only kills playback, but also the player itself in many instances on awake, forcing a refresh of the entire page. The logic is that most mobile users pay for data per gigabyte/kilobyte, and overage gets expensive, so the browser will take any chance it gets to kill your audio. That’s where audio sprites come in.